Did the Oregon State coach cross the line..
by TWO (2018-06-29 12:40:48)

with his use of his freshman pitcher, Kevin Abel? He pitched 3 games in 5 days

– 95 pitches in a win over Mississippi State on Saturday to reach the CWS finals against Arkansas

– 23 pitches during an inning of relief against Arkansas on Wednesday to keep it a 1-run game

– 129 pitches in Thursday’s shutout win over Arkansas

Naturally Abel didn't want to come out of the Championship game, and he was just terrific, threw a 2 hit shutout. But should he have pitched that much in such a short period of time.


Here's a far more objective article on the topic. (link)
by domerduck  (2018-06-30 15:30:30)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


I'll answer your question-No!!! The article is reckless in
by domerduck  (2018-06-30 02:16:04)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

its accusation. Certainly Abel's parents supported Pat keeping him in (see attached article). It was clear he wasn't stressing and it was also clear that Casey was giving him rope based on whether he put anyone on. Starting in the 6th inning Pat was ready to replace him if he got one batter on. He didn't. He earned the right to stay out there

Pitch count is less important than when and how the pitches were made. His liberal use of this very effective change up was helpful. He also started to use his curve in the later part of the game. I think he'll be fine and will have fun watching him here in Corvallis he next two years.


He (Casey) most certainly was reckless
by Cards86  (2018-07-15 20:04:11)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

The article you reference and your comments on the subject are certainly spot on - stressful versus non-stressful innings matter. However, the job of a coach is to protect the player from himself. No player that I have ever come across willingly comes out of a game when everything is on the line. They all want the ball. All of them.

I too have some experience with this. As minor league field coordinator for a Major League club I would find it reckless and selfish to throw a pitcher 241 pitches in 5 days. We in pro ball would be fired for such use. No 18-19 year old should be asked to do such a thing. Pitches in the college World Series are inherently stressful.

Casey chased the win - no doubt. We shall see how it affects this young man moving forward. I suspect there will be some repercussions down the road.

As a side note we did not sign two of our draft picks this year due to injuries sustained during the year in college - both injuries directly related to overuse.


I bet the Arkansas 2nd baseman who dropped popup for 3rd out
by NDoggie78  (2018-06-29 14:52:30)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

in Game 2 to win the championship feels the agony of defeat


I'm sure he does, but ...
by CJC  (2018-06-29 15:27:01)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

First, he didn't drop a popup; he overran the ball, which is certainly a misplay, albeit on a pretty difficult play.

Moreover, the more I watch the replay, the more I'm convinced that the rightfielder should bear the greatest burden for the ball not being caught.

He clearly had slowed up before the ball landed -- and almost certainly could have reached the ball before it landed, without diving or leaving his feet.

That play is much easier for the outfielder than it is for the infielder and frankly, the outfielder coming in on that ball and calling off the infielder going out is textbook fundamentals for outfield play.


1st baseman gets brushed by 2nd baseman
by ndgotrobbedin97  (2018-06-29 15:44:03)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

That starts the confusion, as he pulls off. The right fielder didn't seem to want it/thought the 1st baseman had it from early in the play.

I see it much the same, though the 1st baseman probably makes that play without a hitch if the 2nd baseman doesn't interfere.


OK, a group effort - still, they had it won *
by NDoggie78  (2018-06-29 16:47:26)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Yes, an excruciating loss for those kids ...
by CJC  (2018-06-29 16:57:11)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

All three of the players had enough time to get to the ball.

IMO, the second baseman had the right idea, at least vis-à-vis the first baseman. As a former first baseman, I'll readily concede that in the vast majority of cases, the second baseman is a better athlete and is just better/more comfortable tracking flies/popups. Additionally, the second baseman typically has a better angle on a play like that, and did on that play, although the ball was close enough to the stands that it wasn't the first baseman's worst nightmare, a ball nearly directly over his head.

Of course, the second baseman didn't execute very well. Brushing the first baseman was a product of his aggressiveness, but the over-aggressiveness really manifested itself when he overran the flight of the ball. I'm sure that the adrenaline produced by the game situation played some role in that.

I wholeheartedly agree with ndgotrobbed that it appeared that the rightfielder didn't "want" the ball. That's horrible for the outfielder. With the ball "reachable" by all three players, he has the easiest play, since he's coming in. He has to "want" that ball and call everybody else off and make the play.


Plus, who wouldn't want to make the final out in the CWS? *
by MackerelSnappingAnarchist  (2018-06-30 01:17:13)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post