the most disturbing article I've ever read
by irishrock (2019-01-11 11:56:25)

The thing I hate most in life is people who are talented and waste their potential.

As I read this article, I didn't know whether to be disgusted, sympathy or sadness.




I'd like to see the other article from the SI cover
by Nathan  (2019-01-11 22:24:41)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

How they play football at Swarthmore. I think it would be fascinating.


They don't
by NDColt  (2019-01-12 20:21:51)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Football was discontinued about 15 years ago.


My very good friend and HS teammate played fullback for Swat
by Moose84  (2019-01-12 17:12:19)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

An engineering major, his folks told him to get his grades up his junior year instead of playing football. He missed playing so much that he played under the assumed name "Rockwell Thisby." He made Sports Illustrated [link below]:

"The First Annual Folger Shakespeare Library's Sportsmen of the Year Awards: To Kevin Lagasse, a fullback for Swarthmore College, whose parents were so opposed to his playing football that he was listed in the school newspaper as Thisby, a character in A Midsummer Night's Dream, to keep them from finding out. (When Swarthmore won its fourth straight game, he decided it was better to be Lagasse than not to be.) And to Oriole Manager Earl Weaver, known chiefly for his midsummer's night screams, who upbraided Miami Herald columnist Edwin Pope for attributing "This above all: To thine own self be true" to Horatio. "Edwin," said Weaver, "if Polonius didn't [bleep] say it, I've lived the last 35 years of my life backwards.""

Although successful, to this day he does not have a degree. We text almost every day.


Hilarious - Thanks for posting the link *
by Nathan  (2019-01-12 22:18:44)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


They use soccer balls? *
by golfjunkie17  (2019-01-12 15:48:55)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Here is a link to the article
by MackerelSnappingAnarchist  (2019-01-12 09:54:42)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I hadn't even noticed it until you said something.


Todd was an abused child.
by Papa November  (2019-01-11 20:43:24)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I know it looks like he had all the talent and privilege in the world. It doesn't matter. He never, ever had the opportunity to decide who he wanted to be and what he wanted to do with his life.

"Marv ordered them to stop playing and start fighting. Todd was not shocked. He had been boxing, against his wishes, since elementary school; Marv enjoyed putting kids in the ring with his son."

This is physical and emotional abuse. The fact that the physical abuse was only ever delivered by a 3rd part doesn't diminish its impact. If anything, it probably made it harder for him to see how disturbed his father was. The fact that Todd only flopped at football and became an addict, as opposed to committing suicide, is a huge accomplishment.


Sorry, but I hardly think becoming a junkie...
by BeastOfBourbon  (2019-01-12 12:26:58)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

should ever be viewed as an accomplishment. I can kind of see your angle, but...no.

Despite the abuse, Todd still had choices and he chose very poorly, over and over again.


This is fundamentally incorrect.
by Papa November  (2019-01-12 14:28:09)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Anyone who works with trauma and addiction for a living, myself included, would tell you that Todd no more had a choice about using than he did as a child about fighting.

It doesn't matter that your logical, rational mind can point to what appears to be a moment of choice. The series of dominos that had fallen in the subconscious mind prior to that seeming choice will have already made the choice for Todd well before that moment.

Every now and then someone is able to exert an iron will and push against the forces of the subconscious. This is called white knuckling it. And it's a recipe for disaster. When an alcoholic is not receiving treatment, but is able to resist drinking, that person is considered a dry drunk. They aren't drinking, but the disease is still active and progressing. They can go thirty years without a drink, but if they are white knuckling it and not receiving treatment, then a single drink is enough to put them into an emotional and physical state that's as if they had been drinking all along.

Most of what drives even disease free people is unconscious. It's much more so with addiction.

So no, Todd did not make poor choices. He was driven to them by a horribly abusive father. But, it WAS Todd's responsibility to eventually make a change and seek help. He finally did. His is a massive success story.


Did you read the whole article?
by DakotaDomer  (2019-01-11 21:10:30)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I’m pretty sure it wasn’t only a 3rd party delivering the abuse. There’s several paragraphs about Marv hitting his kid personally.


The two of us are the same age
by irishrock  (2019-01-11 21:02:42)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I had a teammate a year behind who played DB at UCLA and he said the worst kept secret in LA was that Marinovich was a druggie. So I’ve never been surprised

The worst part about the article was how the daughter was treated. Yes, Todd’s story is a bad one. But hers is heartbreaking.


Hyperbole. Either that, or you don't read very much *
by Hanratty5ND  (2019-01-11 17:23:07)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Thanks for the useless, douchey comment *
by The Magic Rat  (2019-01-12 14:25:40)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


If that’s what you have to say...
by paddyoreilly  (2019-01-12 12:11:46)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Why say anything? Doesn’t add a lot to the dialogue, imho. I found the article quite disturbing also, and had a similar range of emotions upon reading...mostly sadness.


Haven't there been multiple "come-back" stories
by nd44  (2019-01-11 15:01:49)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

written about Todd? He was arrested (again) last March twice in one week FFS


This seems to be the 5th I’ve read
by irishrock  (2019-01-11 15:41:49)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I’ve never read about the sister before...poor lady. Her upbringing sounds miserable


Marv is a Trojan. He’s also been a p*ick most of his life.
by MidnightRambler  (2019-01-11 14:17:46)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Impressed by the daughter trying to do the “right thing”, whether dad deserved it or not.
F Todd.


As the parent of an addict
by IrishNYCA  (2019-01-11 13:32:30)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

All I can say is try to have empathy. It’s difficult for me most days. Frustrating to see your extremely smart and athletically gifted child on the street. Addiction is an illness. And yet there’s no medicine to cure it. The addict will battle their demons all their life. Family, friends, society, and the addict will all suffer.


God bless you and your child *
by irishrock  (2019-01-11 13:46:31)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post


Not me. People who waste athletic talent dont bother me,
by pjnuge  (2019-01-11 13:18:22)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Those who waste their intellect which Todd
Is obviously lacking bother me much more. Besides was he really that talented? Jamarcus Russell and others who have physical tools
Flamed out because talent is more than measurables.


I am a little perplexed by your reaction
by bmoreirish  (2019-01-11 12:23:24)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I only feel sympathy. In theory, Todd Marinovich was given everything, but in truth he never had a chance.


your second line is why I have mixed reactions
by irishrock  (2019-01-11 12:33:01)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

His dad figuratively killed his future. So did drugs...and that was his choice until it wasn't anymore (due to the addiction)


Our choices are shaped by our upbringing
by elterrible  (2019-01-11 13:44:23)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

nothing in life happens in a vacuum. He may not have turned to drugs, or been so enamored with them, if other parts of his life had been adequately nurtured.


Or maybe he would have. Plenty of people with great parents
by TAR  (2019-01-11 22:15:07)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

Are raised in a loving environment and given seemingly every opportunity and motivation to make good choices still end up making bad choices and getting into things that can’t get themselves out of.


Agreed *
by bmoreirish  (2019-01-11 14:48:24)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post