Documentary recommendation
by HoundDog1973 (2019-01-29 17:46:02)

I recently watched “Ice Guardians” on Netflix and thought it was very good. It is about fighting and the role of the enforcer in hockey. It looks at the issue historically, the role it plays in injuries and concussions, how it is good for the game, and why some people want to eliminate it. It is well done and very frankly addresses a somewhat controversial subject. The main takeaway is that the enforcer is very valuable to his team and the game as a whole. I think it is worth a hockey fan’s time to check it out. It was made in 2016 I believe. I don’t recall seeing any discussion here about it before.


Great recommendation
by crazychester  (2019-02-01 16:22:24)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I watched it last night. Exhaustive on the subject including a somewhat humorous exploration of "the code" that Now Hang Up touched on above. They also had a brief clip of a certain NHU relative making his feelings about the lack of enforcement in modern hockey very clear.

The doc does a good job of looking at fighting warts and all and certainly does not hide from the warts. I think it did a good job of not lionizing fighting too much, though it's pretty clear on which side of the divide they come down. I think, ultimately, they make a pretty compelling case.


I just heard Dave "The Hammer" Schultz on the radio
by garbageplate  (2019-01-30 11:01:07)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

He was interviewed in Buffalo because he's going to be in town for a celebrity roast of Danny Gare. Anyway, he mentioned that he actually dreaded having to fight, but he knew that it was his role from the moment that he started his minor league career with a few fights (despite being a consistent scorer in juniors). When playing Boston, Terry O'Reilly would make it his responsibility to fight Schultz and the two eventually fought eight times over their careers.

Rob Ray often discusses his reticence and trepidation about fighting. Some people might think that he and Tie Domi (among others) mixing it up, but for Ray and probably for most, that wasn't the case.


My first Flyers game: Schultz hat trick, then he
by Dude87  (2019-02-01 09:45:06)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

pummeled Brad Park for no good reason at all. The worst thing in hockey in 1973-1978 was to be up 3-0 or down 3-0 to the Flyers. Either way, shit was going down.


Those were classic ...
by BIGSKYND  (2019-01-30 11:44:20)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

not many people realize that one year (forget which) Taz nearly cracked the 100-point barrier. I'm pretty sure the Hammer never came close. Between him, Hound Kelly, Dornhoefer, and Homlgren that was a tough crew. Add in Booby Clark and his (very) loose stick - just ask Valeri Kharamov.


Unfortunately, those were all before my time
by garbageplate  (2019-01-30 15:58:43)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

I've seen highlights of the fog game between Buffalo and Philly with former Sabres announcer Jim Lorentz killing a bat, and heard some of the stories, but it's another world for me. Schultz never scored more than 40 points in a year and he said on his interview that he got sent down to Rochester by Scotty Bowman after a brief stint in Buffalo, which effectively ended his NHL career.

I enjoy hearing about those days. I'm sure I would've enjoyed that era of hockey.

EDIT- linking an interesting story that I found from Schultz from the NYT in 1982 with some regrets about his career.


I remember the fog game ....
by BIGSKYND  (2019-01-30 16:26:39)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

and the clash of styles between the Bullies and the French Connection. Perreault was a guy that the lunatics in Montreal always thought they somehow got screwed on getting.


There is a theory that the NHL game has become...
by BIGSKYND  (2019-01-29 18:25:42)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

more dangerous in the past few years because of the severe cutback in fighting and the resulting removal of "enforcers" from the game. You now see a lot more stick work, bad board hits, etc by guys who would probably restrain themselves more if they knew that the next shift could send then to the quiet room.


I think it is more than a theory, it is a widely held view
by HoundDog1973  (2019-01-29 19:59:17)     cannot delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post

A recent survey of all NHL players found that 98% of them are against the banning of fighting in the game. They are the people who play the game and are in the dressing rooms. They know how important it is to their safety. With players getting bigger, faster and stronger and flying around the ice over 30 mph it is the fights and the threat of facing a fight that keeps a lot of the cheap shots from happening. They think it keeps order in the game that would otherwise disappear.


We agree - semantics *
by BIGSKYND  (2019-01-30 08:46:45)     Delete  |  Edit  |  Return to Board  |  Ignore Poster   |   Highlight Poster  |   Reply to Post